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Professor Roy Chan explained why sexually-transmitted diseases are managed by dermatologists

Interview with Prof Roy Chan, former Director of the National Skin Centre and Founding President of Action for AIDS (Singapore). He explained why sexually-transmitted diseases are managed by dermatologists in Singapore, and also discussed the state of HIV social acceptance and management in Singapore

Drugs can control HIV but cure a ‘long way off’

Professor Roy Chan, who is on the governing council of the International Aids Society and president of Action for Aids, told The Straits Times: “(The virus) infects and multiplies in a variety of organs – these include the brain, lymph nodes, genital tract and gut. These organs are reservoirs of HIV that are not treated and cannot be eliminated by conventional antiretroviral treatment…

Charlie Sheen reveals he’s HIV positive

Sheen, 50, told NBC’s Today show he was diagnosed about four years ago and said the reason he disclosed the information was because he was being blackmailed.

“I am here to admit that I am in fact HIV positive,” Sheen said yesterday, saying he was “not entirely sure” how he acquired the virus.
“It’s a hard three letters to absorb,” he added.

New antibody suppresses HIV for 28 days after single dose

A new lab-made antibody can suppress HIV for up to 28 days after only a single dose, researchers at the Rockefeller University in New York have found.

Their work was published in the journal Nature on 8 April and was the first time that a new generation of HIV antibodies had been tested in humans.

‘We conclude that, as a single agent, 3BNC117 is safe and effective in reducing HIV-1 viraemia, and that immunotherapy should be explored as a new modality for HIV-1 prevention, therapy and cure,’ wrote the study’s lead author, Michel Nussenzweig.

Full article

Consolidated guidelines (UNAIDS 2014)

People at higher risk of HIV infection are not getting the health services they need, according to a new report by the World Health Organization entitled Consolidated guidelines on HIV prevention, diagnosis, treatment and care for key populations.

Released on 11 July, the publication warns that failure to provide adequate

 

HIV services for key groups, such as men who have sex with men, people in prison, people who inject drugs, sex workers and transgender people, threatens the global progress of the HIV response.

The consolidated guidelines outline the steps for countries to take to reduce new HIV infections and increase access to HIV testing, treatment and care services by populations at higher risk. The report aims to provide a comprehensive package of evidence-informed HIV-related recommendations for all populations, increase awareness of the needs of and issues important to key populations, improve access, coverage and uptake of effective and acceptable services, and catalyse greater national and global commitment to adequate funding and services.

“Failure to provide services to the people who are at greatest risk of HIV jeopardizes further progress against the global epidemic and threatens the health and well-being of individuals, their families and the broader community.”

Gottfried Hirnschall, Director of the HIV Department at the World Health Organization


 

First published – July 11 2014

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