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Ex-swim Star Wins Healthcare Award

We are proud to announce that Prof Roy Chan has been awarded “National Outstanding Clinician” award.” This exciting news of him winning the award has filled us with extreme joy and pleasure.

The news of his winning did not come as a surprise. Having known the amount of hard work he puts in everything he does, this award serves as a recognition of his dedication. Since the very beginning, we have all seen him thrive hard to achieve the best results. His sincerity and passion to excel has borne such fruitful results. Heartiest Congratulations Prof Roy Chan!

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Student, 20, with HIV afraid to tell his parents

As a student in a tertiary institute, Brandon (not his real name) is used to taking tests.

But this was one examination that the 20-year-old had hoped to get a negative result on – a test for HIV.

Just after his 19th birthday, Brandon came down with a month-long fever.

Speaking to The New Paper on the condition of anonymity, Brandon said that back then, he told his parents and friends that it was dengue fever.

Deep down however, he suspected it was something more serious.

“I figured that it’s my problem so I have to deal with it myself, that’s why I went for the test alone. I didn’t want to rely on others,” said Brandon, who went to the Action for Aids (AFA) clinic in Kelantan Lane to get tested.

When the results were ready, an AFA volunteer took him to a “large, empty room” and broke the news to him.

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Professor Roy Chan explained why sexually-transmitted diseases are managed by dermatologists

Interview with Prof Roy Chan, former Director of the National Skin Centre and Founding President of Action for AIDS (Singapore). He explained why sexually-transmitted diseases are managed by dermatologists in Singapore, and also discussed the state of HIV social acceptance and management in Singapore

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Drugs can control HIV but cure a ‘long way off’

Professor Roy Chan, who is on the governing council of the International Aids Society and president of Action for Aids, told The Straits Times: “(The virus) infects and multiplies in a variety of organs – these include the brain, lymph nodes, genital tract and gut. These organs are reservoirs of HIV that are not treated and cannot be eliminated by conventional antiretroviral treatment…